My First Twitter Chat was a SUCCESS!

Call me archaic.  Call me old-school.  Call me “not with the times.”  All of these statements are true to some extent.  But, I am trying and my goal this year is to become a stronger Twitter patron, and last night I took my first step.  I joined the fast and furious world of Twitter Chats, and in a word it was exhilarating.  No, really.  Not exaggerating.  But I’m also a nerd.

There were so many ideas being thrown about regarding topics that energized me, and I could not get enough.  I was eating it up and “favorite”-ing, tagging, and archiving at pace this archaic gal didn’t know she had.  Below I share with you my favorites, tags, and archives:

Two Writing Teachers Bloghttps://twowritingteachers.wordpress.com/  If you don’t follow it, START NOW!

Slice of Life: Weekly student challenge to describe daily events with as much realism as possible.  Easy entry into writing for our students who resist it.  Find out more at the link below!

Aim Higher Chat Series Links:  Below are the links to all the topics that were discussed on Twitter throughout the past week.  Really great topics!  If you look at the end of the URL you can see them.

Conferring Documents/Ideas:

Behavioral Writing Tool
Tool to observe student behaviors when writing

https://twowritingteachers.wordpress.com/2013/11/02/coaching-conferences-in-the-writing-workshop/

Checklist Ideas:

Mid-Year Assessments: A big topic last night was mid-year assessments.  I love this idea.  We often assess around the genre, but when we look at the big picture our students should be transferring all we have taught them across genres.  When do we assess that?  Generally, we don’t.  The PDF below gives a student document for them to self-evaluate.  In giving an assessment, any type of authentic prompt writing will suffice.

Student Self-Evaluation: https://twowritingteachers.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/midyear-self-evaluation.pdf

Two Ideas I Loved:

* Seminars: This can be a creative way to set goals in your classroom.  As you come to the end of a genre in reading and/or writing, think about the big goals or standards that students are still not getting.  Then pull the group of students together who have mastered that concept.  These groups can hold “seminars” during composing time for other students to sign-up and attend based on their goal to foster an environment of learning from their peers.  An EdCamp so-to-speak, but around student goals!  How cool!

Other goal-setting ideas in pictures below:

Tripod Writing Goals
Making student writing goals visible by placing them at their work station or desk grouping.
Writing Goals Chart
Using pocket chart to write class goals and putting students’ names next to the one they are working on.

*Across Class WritingPartners:  The idea behind this is that students from other classes are partnered up to look at each other’s work and provide feedback and ideas.  As teachers, we often trade the on-demand pieces in order to remove bias from grading, but how often do we allow our students to talk to others about their work outside of their own classroom too?  Getting a chance to hear another’s view of your work who is not in the same classroom, with all the background knowledge of what is going on with that piece can provide students with a new, enlightened frame of mind.

I know there is a TON of information here, but hopefully I have organized it in a way that you can pick and choose what you like and/or need.  All of this came from just one hour of “chatting.”  Incredible.  Want to talk about PD that flies!?!?  Here it is!

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